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Tag: Webelow Wear News Clips

Wearables News Clips for Tuesday, June 18, 2013

by on Jun.18, 2013, under Wearables, Wearables News, Webelow Wear News Clips

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In today’s clips we learn about Disney going wearable, the now open-sourced Sony SmartWatch,  mind control projects using wearable technology, and a fellowship by Eyebeam for wearable fashion designers.


Disney Gets Into Wearable Tech With The ’MagicBand’
The Next Web

Disney MagicBand is a ticket, hotel room key, and credit card.

Disney MagicBand is a ticket, hotel room key, and credit card.

Disney is introducing a new MagicBand device that ties into a new service that allows theme park visitors to make purchases and reserve experiences … The bands are a colorful wrist device made of rubberized plastic that will allow visitors to the park to tap on check in points to enable various experiences. The bands are adult and child-sized units with both Bluetooth and RF technology inside for long-range and short-range reading. The bands can be ordered online and come free with purchases of tickets or packages.

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Sony SmartWatch Now “Open-Sourced”
adafruit

Sony SmartWatch now open-sourced.

Sony SmartWatch now open-sourced.

Although the small device didn’t get too much attention from the tech fans when it launched … it may get a little more  … with Sony’s recent announcement that its SmartWatch has now become open-sourced.

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Review Sony’s Open SmartWatch Project


The Power of the Mind: Five Amazing Projects Controlled With Your Brain
Fashioning Tech

Mind Control Projects Using Wearable Technology

Mind Control Projects Using Wearable Technology

Mind-controlled projects still seem like a novelty, especially since they often require one to wear clunky head-gear. If we look back at the earliest formal expressions of wearable technology, they too went through their awkward adolescent stage in development. With this mind, let’s take a look at five fascinating projects controlled by one’s brain waves. Because ultimately wearables like Glass will only work seamlessly if we actually don’t have to shout commands to our devices.

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Eyebeam Computational Fashion Fellowship 2013-4
Fashioning Tech

Computational Fashion Fellowship open to NY based fashion designers interested in wearable technology.

Computational Fashion Fellowship open to NY based fashion designers interested in wearable technology.

Eyebeam is pleased to announce the Computational Fashion Fellowship call for proposals for 2013/2014. New York-based fashion designers with a strong interest in all aspects of wearable technology are invited to apply. The Fellowship supports research, collaboration, and the presentation of experimental and cutting edge technology within fashion. APPLICATION DEADLINE: Monday, July 8, 12:00 PM (noon) Eastern Standard Time.

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Introducing Webelow Wear News Clips

by on Jun.17, 2013, under Wearables, Wearables News, Webelow Wear News Clips

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Tired of surfing the internet for up-to-date info about wearables and wearable technology? Want to know what’s happening right now without blog hopping for hours? Get today’s top stories about wearables and wearable technology here with Webelow Wear News Clips.


A Wearable Alert To Head Injuries In Sports
New York Times

A new impact-sensing cap from Reebok and MC10 blinks yellow or red if an athlete suffers a moderate or severe blow to the head.

Impact-sensing cap blinks yellow or red if an athlete suffers a moderate or severe blow to the head.

Hard knocks to the head are a constant concern in contact sports — and not just in football or boxing, where recent attention has focused. Millions of girls and boys play hockey, soccer, lacrosse and other sports where blows to the head from collisions and falls are part of the game, even in youth leagues and on high school teams … A crop of new lightweight devices that athletes can wear on the field may help people on sidelines keep better track of hits to players’ heads during games and practice sessions. The devices, packed with sensors and microprocessors, register a blow to a player’s skull and immediately signal the news by blinking brightly, or by sending a wireless alert.

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Power Shorts: Shake Your Rear To Charge Your Gear
CNET

Power Shorts, which harvest movement to boost the battery life of mobile devices

Power Shorts harvest movement to boost the battery life of mobile devices

At the outdoor festival in Glastonbury, England, this weekend, mobile carrier Vodafone will try on its new Power Shorts, which harvest movement to boost the battery life of mobile devices … The shorts — created with help from scientists at the University of Southampton — incorporate a Power Pocket that contains foam-like ferroelectret materials with pockets of permanently charged surfaces. When the material gets squashed or deformed through movement, kinetic energy gets produced. Vodafone says a full day’s walking and dancing will charge a smartphone for more than four hours (not much, but way more than campers can expect from those hawthorn-tree outlets).

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Redmond Company Developing Computerized Socks
KomoNews

Heapslyon, is making completely normal, washable socks that are embedded with sensors that users can't even feel.

Heapslyon is making completely normal, washable socks that are embedded with sensors that users can't even feel.

The socks feel like any other sock until you attach a magnetic anklet that feeds back information, via Bluetooth, to a computer that can not only display waveforms of impacts on the foot, but a smartphone app will eventually give a user audio cues in their ear bud when their running technique is poor.  The free app will also display east to understand graphics on how to improve their stride.

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Hardwired: New Online Show on Wearable Tech
Fashioning Tech

"Hardwired" with iJustine coversfitness tech.

"Hardwired" with iJustine coversfitness tech.

With the launch of AOL’s latest online show “Hardwired” it is evident that “wearable technology” is the tech world’s latest muse. As expected, the first episode covers fitness tech: the Jawbone Up and the Adidas heart rate monitoring sports bra.   The show’s host, Justine Ezarik, takes her fitness data to experts and asks the quintessential question: What does mean? And the basic answer is “You’re healthy and normal.” And there lies the problem with all these tracking devices. They don’t really offer most of us much in terms of actionable feedback beyond pretty bar graphs. They don’t educate us on how to interpret this data over time. And the motivation mechanics are weak at best. In short, the industry has focused keenly on getting the algorithms right to interpret a step from a bump in the road while driving and very little on the user experience.

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